Law School Loans

Pay less for law school
A flexible law school loan with a budget-based repayment plan is here. Check your eligibility in 2 minutes.

When searching for a law school loan, you can expect some serious lender benefits. Some of these benefits include:

  • No fees, period
  • Skip a payment once per year
  • Save with a 0.25% AutoPay discount
  • Inviting a cosigner is easy
  • Longer 9-month grace period
  • Make a $25 in-school payment
  • Talk to a human
  • And more…
Law School Loans

Current Law School Loans

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Build a loan that works with your financial situation

Law School Loans
2 Minute Application
Apply online and upload all documents on your phone
Law School Loans
Receive a Decision Fast
Lender decision in 72-hours or less
Law School Loans
Payments that Work for You
Choose a payment plan or pay nothing while in school

Would I be a good candidate for a Law School loan?

Before moving forward and filling out a loan application with one of our lenders, you may want to make sure you have completed all of these free options prior to applying for a law school loan. A few programs that you should look into would be:

If you have exhausted all of the above options, you can select one of the lenders above to work with or head over to our student loans page.

Law School Loans

Top Questions Surrounding Law School Loans

  • Can you get student loans for law school?
  • What federal loan options should I consider before applying for a private student loan?
  • How much can you take out in loans for law school?
  • What is the difference between Federal Direct PLUS loans and private student loans?
  • Can Law School Loans Cover Living Expenses?
  • Are bar study loans the same as student loans?
  • What Law School Loans are available?
Can you get student loans for law school?

All law school students should first use the FAFSA to apply for federal financial aid. After maxing out Federal Direct unsubsidized loans, many students take out other types of law school student loans, such as the Federal Direct PLUS loans (which have a flat interest rate and a mandatory origination fee) or private law school loans (which typically have no fees, and rates that depend on your credit history).

What federal loan options should I consider before applying for a private student loan?

Before applying for private student loans, it’s best to look at other sources of financial aid first and speak to someone in your school’s financial aid office. It’s recommended that you use a 4-step approach to get the funds you need:

  1. Look for educational funding you don’t have to pay back, like scholarships, grants, and work-study opportunities.
  2. Fill out a FAFSA® form to apply for federal student loans. Most federal student loans don’t require a credit check or a cosigner and offer federal programs if you’re struggling with payments.
  3. Consider asking a parent to look at federal parent loans. The Parent PLUS loan is issued directly to parents or guardians of current students.
  4. Look at a private student loan to cover any differences between your total cost of attendance and the amount not included in steps 1-3.

To learn more about federal student loan programs, visit the U.S. Department of Education. You can also fill out a free application for federal student aid or FAFSA® here.

The best private student loans should give you a low-interest rate that will complement your federal financial aid. Keep in mind that you will accumulate interest on both federal student loans and private student loans over time.

How much can you take out in loans for law school?

Grad students (including those working on a law degree) are eligible to take out up to $20,500 in Federal Direct unsubsidized loans each year. Federal Direct PLUS loans and private student loans do not have a cap.

What is the difference between Federal Direct PLUS loans and private student loans?

Federal Direct PLUS loans are offered by the government, while private loans are offered by private lenders. Federal PLUS loans are available through the FAFSA, and good credit history is not a qualification requirement. However, Federal PLUS loans do have a mandatory loan origination fee and a flat interest rate. Private student loans typically have no loan fees, and your interest rate depends on your credit profile or that of your cosigner if you have one.

Can Law School Loans Cover Living Expenses?

Yes. You can borrow up to your law school’s total cost of attendance in loans. Cost of attendance typically includes money for living expenses such as off-campus housing and transportation.

Are bar study loans the same as student loans?

Loans for bar exam expenses are more like personal loans than student loans. Bar loans have higher interest rates than student loans, and you usually cannot refinance them with your student loans.

What Law School Loans are available?

You can take out unsubsidized federal student loans, federal PLUS loans, and private student loans to pay for law school. You should typically max out federal loans as a first option.